Thursday, November 07, 2013

La jetée

"La jetée" by Chris Marker from Steele on Vimeo. Semi-remade by Terry Gilliam in 1995 as 12 Monkeys.

Sanborn Maps

Sanborn Maps at the WHS. "...Sanborn maps were published between the 1870s and 1950s so local insurance agents could assess the risk of fire breaking out on a client's premises. They outline each building, including the type of heating, size and number of stories, the location of windows and doors, and similar structural features. Through color coding, they even show the composition of building materials. They also document the strength of the local fire department and the presence of hazards such as blacksmith forges, bakeries or stored kerosene, and the existence of firefighting equipment, cisterns or community water works. They also note streets, rivers, canals, railroad corridors and other topographic features. Most Sanborn maps focus on downtowns, but some include large portions of residential areas. Individual homes are recorded with the same precision as large factories."

Stan VanDerBeek

Stan VanDerBeek. "...A pioneer in the development of experimental film and live-action animation techniques, Stan VanDerBeek achieved widespread recognition in the American avant-garde cinema. An advocate of the application of a utopian fusion of art and technology, he began making films in 1955. In the 1960s, he produced theatrical, multimedia pieces and computer animation, often working in collaboration with Bell Telephone Laboratories. In the 1970s, he constructed a 'Movie Drome' in Stony Point, New York, which was an audiovisual laboratory for the projection of film, dance, magic theater, sound and other visual effects. His multimedia experiments included movie murals, projection systems, planetarium events and the exploration of early computer graphics and image-processing systems."

Friday, October 25, 2013

Kyle

Happy Birthday to my son Kyle - 16 years old today.

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Sheila by Tommy Roe

William S. Burroughs Sings

William S. Burroughs Sings at UbuWeb Sound. "...After a while, it wasn't enough to just listen to Burroughs read his own works, with increasingly elaborate musical backings, but to hire him to perform on other people's recordings. And that is what we have here: not Burroughs' own releases, but his various miscellaneous appearances on other bands' songs. Having Burroughs perform your music gave you instant hip cred, and gave a Bill a paycheck. He was a rock star to rock stars. William S. Burroughs died in 1997, at age 83."

Trailer for Boy


Trailer for Boy (Shonen, 1969, directed by Nagisa Oshima, Flash Video 04:17).

Saturday, October 05, 2013

She's An Adulteress

She's An Adulteress by Sprague Brothers on Grooveshark
The Sprague Brothers... She's An Adulteress. From the album The Savage Sprague Brothers - Early Recordings From The Vault (Wichita Falls Records).

Woman In The Moon - Launch Sequence

Woman In The Moon - Launch Sequence (1929, directed by Fritz Lang, Flash Video 07:43).

Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Early Prints

Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Early Prints at Edwynn Hauk Gallery. "...Originally trained as a painter in the studio of the Cubist artist and sculptor André Lhote, Henri Cartier-Bresson turned to photography out of frustration with his early painting. Inspired by his interaction with young members of the Surrealist movement, Cartier-Bresson recognized photography’s ability to 'trap life' instantly. When he was twenty-four, Cartier-Bresson acquired a hand-held Leica camera, which would accompany him for the rest of his career. The Leica became an “extension of his eye” and enabled the artist to combat the 'formal and unnatural behavior' of those who were aware of being photographed. Cartier-Bresson fully embraced the freedom and anonymity that this small camera gave him."

Friday, September 27, 2013

William John Kennedy: WARHOL LOVE INDIANA

William John Kennedy: WARHOL LOVE INDIANA at Steven Kasher Gallery in NYC. "...Kennedy’s images capture the two artists and their soon-to-be iconic works at the birth of their careers and the birth of the Pop Art movement. The young artists are portrayed as both playful and serious, and even prescient of their future fame. Kennedy produced one of the few images of Warhol and Indiana together. He captured Indiana in his studio with his first LOVE painting. Kennedy’s photographs of Warhol are unique in their portrayal of the artist interacting with his paintings in a year that he produced more masterpieces than any other year: Marilyn, Liz, Jackie, Most Wanted, Elvis, Race Riot, Early Self, and Flowers, to name a few. It was Warhol’s second year making films, the year of Blow Job, Empire, Eat (starring Indiana) and the first Screen Tests. Kennedy’s insight was to reveal Warhol and Indiana in performance with their signature artworks."

Excerpt from Eisenstein's October - Ten Days That Shook the World

Thursday, September 26, 2013

The Feelies - Higher Ground

Cristina De Middel “The Afronauts”

Cristina De Middel “The Afronauts” at Dillon Gallery in NYC. "...In 1964, still living the dream of their recently gained independence, Zambia started a space program that would put the first African on the moon catching up the US and the Soviet Union in the space race. Only a few optimists supported the project by Edward Makuka, a schoolteacher in charge of presenting the ambitious program and getting the necessary funding. But the financial aid never came, as the United Nations declined their support and one of the astronauts, a 16-year-old girl, became pregnant and had to quit. This is how the heroic initiative turned into a curious episode in African history, surrounded by wars, violence, droughts and hunger."

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

George Tice: 60 years of Photography

George Tice: 60 years of Photography at Nailya Alexander Gallery. "...Exhibited internationally, George Tice’s work is represented in over one hundred museum collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and the Newark Museum. George Tice’s first show in New York was at the Underground Gallery in 1965. In 1972, he had a one-man show Paterson, New Jersey at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The International Center of Photography exhibited George Tice: Urban Landscapes in 2002."